Who chooses when to photograph what – and why is it so?

0
91
www.blaininc.comuploads3850385007659398625 9616eb6347d757ea297536ade4f90f48bcd648a7 1
www.blaininc.comuploads3850385007659398625 9616eb6347d757ea297536ade4f90f48bcd648a7 1
Picture

The premise of this title is to ascertain why there is a requirement to document. 
History has a rather emotional attachment – to what has gone before us in time – especially in relation to cities, architecture and art, anthropology, cultural landscapes and experiences of a time gone by. 
Professional photography is commissioned and artistic, driven on the whole by an outcome. 
There is performance photography in the arts and sport, commercial and advertising.  
Within each of these sub sections are more specialisations where photographers adapt and explore their surroundings, experience emotive expansions/contractions while ‘creativing’ and engaging with social networks. 
A time line of images and imagery.
For a creative business to remain a viable proposition, the photographer (in this case) must generate an income. 
I have seen in my travels many slogans as to what is and isn’t – one that comes to mind is about outcomes.

“Ideas drive us, creativity inspires us, outcomes are what feeds us”.

Focussing on the outcome is one way of achieving its end – but the journey throughout the duration of the idea is where the creativity happens. 
The same is true for a photographic assignment or project.
Outcome achieved and then the next idea begins. Creating from a three dimensional World to a two dimensional object is the nature of the photograph.

So – why photograph? We all love to see, feel, experience, grow, learn, collect ideas and accumulate a portfolio of images which document our own journey through life. 
This will be very different from person to person as our observations and World changes constantly and all vary from one person to the next. 

This image “The World at Play” shows a couple happily engaging on a tropical beach at dusk.
Location: India 2014
Blain Crellin Photography