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What Do They Check For Caravan Roadworthy

Mick Pacholli
Mick Pachollihttps://www.tagg.com.au
Mick created TAGG - The Alternative Gig Guide in 1979 with Helmut Katterl, the world's first real Street Magazine. He had been involved with his fathers publishing business, Toorak Times and associated publications since 1972.  Mick was also involved in Melbourne's music scene for a number of years opening venues, discovering and managing bands and providing information and support for the industry. Mick has also created a number of local festivals and is involved in not for profit and supporting local charities.        

If you’re new to caravanning, one of the essential things you need to do before getting the show on the road is to register your caravan. You’re legally obligated to do this before you can drive it on roads. As part of the registration process, your caravan will be inspected to determine if it’s roadworthy.

The main goal of roadworthiness checks is to identify and rectify potential hazards that could compromise the safety of both the occupants of the caravan and other road users. If you’re having your caravan checked for roadworthiness, you might want to know the things the authorities are likely to check. In this post, we’ll cover some of the basic things that are likely to get checked.

Chassis and Suspension

The caravan’s chassis and suspension are fundamental components that undergo rigorous scrutiny during a roadworthiness inspection. A compromised chassis can cause severe structural issues and instability while towing your caravan. Consequently, inspectors check for signs of corrosion, cracks, and other forms of damage to the caravan’s chassis. Other suspension components, such as axles, springs, and shock absorbers, are also inspected for wear and tear.

Brakes and Wheels

Your caravan’s braking system has to be in good order for safe towing and stopping. To determine this, inspectors have to inspect components of the braking system, such as brake pads, drums, discs, and hydraulic systems. You may also be asked to drive the vehicle and engage the brake to see how efficient the brakes are.

Your wheels and tires are also part of the caravan’s braking system. Worn or damaged tires are not just at risk of blowouts; they also make braking less efficient.  As part of the inspection, your tires will be examined for tread wear, damage, and proper inflation.

Lights and Electrical Systems

Lights are a critical aspect of road safety, especially when towing a caravan. A well-functioning lighting system ensures that your caravan remains visible to other drivers, especially at night. Inspectors may check all exterior lights, including headlights, taillights, brake lights, turn signals, and clearance lights. Other electrical components of the caravan may also be inspected.

Gas and Water Systems

This is for caravans that come equipped with gas and water systems for cooking, heating, and sanitation. These systems must be inspected to ensure they are leak-free and working properly. Gas appliances are tested for gas leaks and proper ventilation to prevent the risk of fire or carbon monoxide poisoning. In some cases, you may be issued a gas compliance certificate. This certification is particularly important if you have permanently installed gas systems in your caravan.

Body and Interior

Finally, the exterior and interior of the caravan will be examined for signs of damage. Not all dents or damages seen on your caravan will affect its roadworthiness. But you should fix damages that could compromise road safety before your roadworthiness inspection. Such damages include major cracks, loose panels, and insecure fittings. Windows and doors will also be checked to ensure they open and close properly.

Inside the caravan, inspectors may check for safety equipment such as fire extinguishers, smoke alarms, and emergency exits. These are essential to the safety of occupants in case of an emergency and must be present in your caravan.


Image Via: Unsplash

Mick Pacholli

Mick created TAGG - The Alternative Gig Guide in 1979 with Helmut Katterl, the world's first real Street Magazine. He had been involved with his fathers publishing business, Toorak Times and associated publications since 1972.  Mick was also involved in Melbourne's music scene for a number of years opening venues, discovering and managing bands and providing information and support for the industry. Mick has also created a number of local festivals and is involved in not for profit and supporting local charities.        

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