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Amanda Flintstone’s deplorable insight into why Australian kids would not accept or be able to handle working in regional areas as apprentices, because it would take them too far from the comforts of their families and friends, beggars belief! Most would jump at the chance to get support for that sort of independence from often dysfunctional families and friends and to gain an opportunity to prove their worth.

Mandy’s answer is to bring apprentices from overseas to fill this supposed gap in our work force smacks of racism, as if these young folk she intends to indenture would not have such like feelings for family and friends, I mean after all they ARE foreigners!

And within this puerile argument we need to recognize that the vast majority of those effected come from a growing underclass, the white Australian male. You know the ones, unlike their female contemporaries; with little infrastructure for societal support other than the penal system should they fall through the cracks.

Cheap labour is probably at the root of the Government’s argument. Keep the working poor in the glutted city market and increase their immigration figures. They might go fully sick on the idea once they rush through their IR laws and we become far South China-like with our national wages and entitlements dashed before our eyes.

Mick Pacholli

Mick created TAGG - The Alternative Gig Guide in 1979 with Helmut Katterl, the world's first real Street Magazine. He had been involved with his fathers publishing business, Toorak Times and associated publications since 1972.  Mick was also involved in Melbourne's music scene for a number of years opening venues, discovering and managing bands and providing information and support for the industry. Mick has also created a number of local festivals and is involved in not for profit and supporting local charities.        

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Mick Pacholli
Mick created TAGG - The Alternative Gig Guide in 1979 with Helmut Katterl, the world's first real Street Magazine. He had been involved with his fathers publishing business, Toorak Times and associated publications since 1972.  Mick was also involved in Melbourne's music scene for a number of years opening venues, discovering and managing bands and providing information and support for the industry. Mick has also created a number of local festivals and is involved in not for profit and supporting local charities.