Home POLITICS/SOCIETY INDIGENOUS AFFAIRS

INDIGENOUS AFFAIRS

Mabo Day on Sunday 3 June 2018, Deakin Edge, Federation Square.

Join with the Torres Strait Islander and Aboriginal communities in Victoria to celebrate one of the most significant dates on the Indigenous calendar, Mabo Day on Sunday 3 June 2018, Deakin Edge, Federation Square. Hosted by the multi-talented Lisa Maza (of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander heritage), this free family friendly concert will feature performances by the acclaimed Torres Strait Islander dance...

Alexis Wright wins 2018 Stella Prize for Tracker, an epic feat of Aboriginal storytelling

Alexis Wright, author of Tracker: a book written in the mode and genre of Aboriginal storytelling. Stella Prize Alexis Wright’s book Tracker: Stories of Tracker Tilmouth has won the 2018 Stella Prize. Tracker is, in Wright’s words, an attempt to tell an “impossible story”, using the voices of many people to reflect on the life of Tilmouth, a central and visionary figure in...

Indigenous voices are speaking loudly on social media but racism endures

Drawing by Wes Mountain/The Conversation, CC BY-ND Social media are a vital resource for Indigenous Australians, connecting them to community and culture, helping identify those at risk of suicide or self-harm, and offering a powerful outlet for political activism. But racism is a major problem for Indigenous people online. A new report, Social Media Mob: Being Indigenous Online, unpacks the complex role social...

The origins of Pama-Nyungan, Australia’s largest family of Aboriginal languages

The spread of Pama-Nyungan was likely influenced by climate. Shutterstock.com The approximately 400 languages of Aboriginal Australia can be grouped into 27 different families. To put that diversity in context, Europe has just four language families, Indo-European, Basque, Finno-Ugric and Semitic, with Indo-European encompassing such languages as English, Spanish, Russian and Hindi. Australia’s largest language family is Pama-Nyungan. Before 1788 it...

A modern and united Australia must shift its national day from January 26

We must change the date of Australia Day again again if we want to achieve a national day that unifies all Australians.  Increased momentum around changing the date of Australia Day reflects a growing sense that January 26 is symbolic of the Australia we used to be, not the Australia we hope to become. Recent moves to promote changing the...

Four Thousand Fish and Broken Glass connect Sydney’s Aboriginal past to its present

Fish iceblocks return slowly to Sydney Harbour in Four Thousand Fish at Sydney Festival. Jamie Williams Last year, the federal government’s swift rejection of an Indigenous Voice to Parliament left an already despairing Aboriginal polity limping out the final weeks and days of 2017, myself included. Without offering an alternate plan for protecting and advancing Aboriginal rights at the national level, hope...

Explainer: the evidence for the Tasmanian genocide

The painting Group of Natives of Tasmania, 1859, by Robert Dowling. Wikimedia At a public meeting in Hobart in the late 1830s, Solicitor-General Alfred Stephen, later Chief Justice of New South Wales, shared with the assembled crowd his solution for dealing with “the Aboriginal problem”. If the colony could not protect its convict servants from Aboriginal attack “without extermination”, said...

Explainer: the seasonal ‘calendars’ of Indigenous Australia

Lalin in Western Australia is   ‘married turtle season’. Brian Gratwicke/Flickr On Wangkumarra land, in the corner-country near the borders of Queensland, New South Wales and South Australia, stands an ancient stone arrangement. It has been placed to the side of a huge complex, rivalling Stonehenge, featuring megaliths polished, carved and placed to balance precariously on each other.   They should fall,...

Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters is a must-visit exhibition for all Australians

Indigenous artists, including Josephine Mick, experience the immersive multimedia DomeLab, part of the Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters exhibition. George Serras, NMA Songlines: Tracking the Seven Sisters is a peerless exhibition of Aboriginal art, thrilling in its breadth and depth. Seven years in the planning, now showing at the National Museum of Australia, it sets a standard that must be emulated elsewhere...

Sunday essay: dreaming of a ‘white Christmas’ on the Aboriginal missions

Christmas Dinner, Mt Margaret Mission 1933.  State Library of Western Australia This story contains images of people who are deceased. Aboriginal missions, which existed across Australia until the 1970s, are notorious for their austerity. Aboriginal people lived on meagre rations - flour, sugar, tea and tobacco - and later, token wages. At some missions, schoolgirls wore hessian sacks as clothes or...

Enjoy shopping with TAGG Dismiss