Listen To Older Voices : Joy Pagalos – Part 1

  Welcome to Listen To Older Voices, a program 
produced by Rob Greaves for Wesley Mission Victoria and podcast 
through the Toorak Times and Tagg.
Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

This is the first part of a 3-part program featuring Joy Pagalos. 
Joy was born in 1942 in Willesden, a suburb just north-west of London. She takes us on a journey through her early years and while her memories of the war years are not so good due to her being so young, her memories of her parents and school years, which she does not fondly recall, are very vivid.
Her first job is working in the office of a quantity surveyor and life was great until a breakdown until a breakdown in the relationship between her father and his mother saw the whole family move to Australia where her father took up a job in Adelaide, a job with the government that he had applied for while still in England and a job he kept until his retirement.
 

Click on the radio to hear Joy Pagalos – Part 1


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon – 

 

[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government 
through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]

 

Listen To Older Voices : Pat Wilson – Part 4

 Welcome to Listen To Older Voices,
a program produced by Rob Greaves for Wesley Mission Victoria and 
podcast through the Toorak Times and Tagg.

Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

In this, the final program on Baby Boomer and successful recording artist Pat Wilson, Pat focuses heavily on issues other than music. She has a highly developed social conscience and talks with great passion on issues involving the ecology and climate science.

Pat values her life and this planet and expresses great concern for what is happening to planet Earth. In my mind Pat exemplifies the adage – “Think globally, act locally”. She sets out her concerns and in doing so reminds us that change for the better can and only will come about when people of good conscience speak out.

Click hear Pat Wilson – Part 4


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon – 

 

 

[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]

OJ SIMPSON (Squeezing the life out of “The Juice”)

OJ has spent just under a decade behind bars, and tomorrow, he could become a free man.  According the Nevada Department of corrections, Simpson’s fate will be placed into the hands of four strangers on the parole board as early as tomorrow’ in the hope of having the remainder of his sentence overturned.

The former NFL star was sentenced to 33 years in a Nevada Prison on burglary and kidnapping charges.  A far cry from the so called “trial of the century” that transfixed America following the murder of his ex wife and her friend Ron Goldman in 1994.

So where did it all go so wrong for Simpson?

Many fans of NRL and in fact the world, were glued to their television sets, transfixed on 61 year old OJ Simpson, dressed in Prison uniform, walking into a Las Vegas courtroom in 2008 after a lifetime of good fortune, had all but dried up. OJ, was convicted of armed burglary and kidnapping after a bungled memorabilia heist in a Las Vegas hotel room, room 1203. Thirty three years in a Nevada Prison, the judge said “the sentence fits this crime” and made it perfectly clear, her decision was not influenced at all by the death of his ex-wife and friend.

Simpsons crooked path to the burglary began nearly a dozen years earlier with one of the most controversial acquittals in history. Simpson was represented by a very high-profile defense team (also referred to as the “Dream Team”), which was initially led by Robert Shapiro and subsequently by Johnnie Cochran.  The team also included F. Lee Bailey, Alan Dershowitz, Robert Kardashian, Shawn Holley, Carl E. Douglas, and Gerald Uelmen.  Two additional attorneys who specialised in DNA evidence, Barry Scheck and Peter Neufeld were also added. Then came the result, “NOT GUILTY” of murdering ex wife Nicole Brown Simpson and her friend Ron Goldman in June of 1994.  It was a “Not Guilty” verdict that kept Simpson out of prison, but it didn’t shield him from being snubbed by his friends and slagged off by his many adoring fans after the trial.

Simpson actually believed that if he was found not guilty, he could just go back to his life and move on, but the people of Brentwood weren’t as forgiving and made it abundantly clear. Now rejected by “white America” he turned to the black community, attending various churches.  He also started attracting friendships with unsavoury types, because to them, they wanted to hang with the ultimate “bad guy”.  The OJ before the trial was a man in demand, a NFL legend, now, he was turning more into “The Godfather”.

  

 

 

 

 

Now the Goldman’s, start squeezing the man, once known as “The Juice”.  The victims familie’s sue Simpson, and the criminal case goes very differently.  No cameras were allowed, and this time, for the first time, Simpson is force to testify.  Once Simpson opened his mouth, his story quickly began to fall apart, and this time the jury finds Simpson liable and awards the grief stricken families, a wrongful death judgement to the amount of a whopping 33 and a half million dollars. Finally justice for Ron and Nicole. Even though Simpson has continually denied any involvement in the murders, his career suffered immensely.

Then the judge in the trial ordered Simpson to hand over 100 items including, the 1968 “Heisman Trophy”, his golf clubs, collectables and various price fetching memorabilia. The sheriff sent moving trucks to Simpsons mansion, but Simpson got wind of this the day before, and had family and friends enter the property, grabbing what they could and taking to their various homes.  Simpson made sure he wasn’t home and was out on a golf course, “deniability”.

The “Heisman Trophy” would later be sold at auction for a quarter of a million dollars, however other items made there way to a Las Vegas hotel room, Room 1203 where the cops and what some might call Karma are about to catch up with Simpson.

It’s now September 13, 2007 and Simpson, now a tarnished celebrity is back on the Vegas strip. He is heading off to a chapel where he would play the role of best man at a friends wedding, but thats not the only reason he is excited.

Thomas Riccio, co-owner of the auction house “Universal Rarities” is said to have alerted Simpson to a collector Al Beardsley who had obtained various items of Simpsons, hoping to on-sell them a great profit. It was agreed that Riccio would set up a meeting with the collectors under the guise that he had a private collector interested in buying the items in a hotel room.

Riccio would later authenticate the items with Simpson, who was unaware that Riccio likes to record all his conversations for legal purposes. Simpson tells Riccio the items are not memorabilia, they are in fact personal items that were stollen from him.

Simpson checks into the Palms Resort and poolside catches up with Riccio and some other unfavourable buddies, strategising on how to get back his stuff. OJ wanted to come across as intimidating as he could, so he asked two of the men separately if they could get hold of a gun.  One of the men, concerned asked Simpson, “What if they call the Police”, to which Simpson replied “Fuck the Police, what are they going to do? Arrest me for taking my own stuff”.

The stage is now set.  Together with his motley crew, Walter Alexander (gun) Michael McClinton (gun) Charles Ehrlich, and Thomas Ricco, they head to the hotel room to meet with the memorabilia collectors.  Before arriving, they recruit two more guys.  The plan was to send in two dummy buyers first. But that plan was thwarted when all the men came together in the hotel lobby.  No-one knew anyone as they made their way up to the room.  A simple knock on the door and all men, two with guns barged into the room.  Riccio armed once again with his recorder, secretly taped the whole incident. These recordings would later prove to the court, OJ’s involvement and rash and extreme behaviour.

Simpson gives the order to grab everything, and stuff it into pillow cases from the bed. Before leaving one of the men removed the phone cord and took the two men’s mobile phones, so that they couldn’t call the police.

After Simpson and his crew left, the two collectors made there way to the hotel lobby where they called 911.

Simpson was later arrested and he told the police that the dispute was merely a confrontation with no guns. He said autographed sports collectibles, his Hall of Fame certificate, a photograph with former FBI director J. Edgar Hoover and video from his first wedding were all his, and that they were stolen from him and were about to be fenced by unethical collectors. Police were clearly  unsure of who owned the memorabilia. But they said the manner in which the goods were taken would come under investigation.

After being whisked away in handcuffs, Simpson was later booked on two counts of robbery with a deadly weapon, two counts of assault with a deadly weapon, and conspiracy to commit a crime and burglary with a firearm.

The judge immediately ordered Simpson be held without bail.

In court at the sentencing, the former college and pro football star said he was simply trying to reclaim family heirlooms and other personal items that had been stolen from him, and claimed that he was unaware his associates were carrying guns.

For Ron Goldman and Nicole Browns families, news of the arrest brought great illation. When the verdict was finally handed down, both families felt that justice had finally been served.

If Simpson is granted parole, he could be walking free as early as October. Simpson’s age and reports of his good behavior in prison make parole a good possibility. He has served nine years of his 33-year sentence so far.

Since 2008, Simpson has been at Lovelock Correctional Facility, a medium-security prison in a remote desert town of the same name.

I guess we’ll all just have to sit back and wait to see how this all pans out.

 

ALICE COOPER (aka Vincent Damon Furnier)

Born Vincent Damon Furnier on 4th February 1948, Detroit Michigan, USA. Furnier, was the pioneer of a new era of rock’n roll, by adding theatrics to his stage shows. He did it before Bowie, he did it before Kiss, he was the worlds first “shock rocker” who inspired many others to follow.

Furnier formed a band in 1964, at the age of 16, with school buddies Glen Buxton (lead guitar), Dennis Dunaway (Bass) John Tatum (guitar) John Speer (drums) and Furnier (lead vocals). They called themselves “The Earwigs” and the motivation behind forming a band, Furnier was eager to participate in the local annual “Letterman’s” talent show, even though at the time none of the boys played any instruments, though their was also talk that the real reason for starting the group was simply to score with the girls in their school. They mimed their performance to Beatles songs. They won and loved the experience of being on stage, so much so that they went to the local pawn shop, bought instruments, and immediately learnt how to play them. A year later, John Tatum left and was replaced with Michael Bruce who was playing rhythm guitar in another band called “Our Gang”. With the new addition came a new name, this time the boys called themselves “The Spiders”.

For the next year, the boys performed locally around Phoenix, with the groups first stage prop placed behind them, a huge black spiders web.

In 1965, Furnier learnt how to play the harmonica and then the boys set about recording their first single titled “Why don’t you love me” (originally performed by The Blackwells). The single was released by Mascot Records, a local label owned by Jack Curtis. Curtis also owned stage 7 a teen club where “The Spiders” were the house band.

In 1966, they all graduated from High School and then went on to record their second single “Don’t blow your mind” their first original composition which became a local #1 hit.

Speer left the group and once again the band went through another name change, this time “The Nazz” and released the single “Wonder who’s lovin her now”. Speer was replaced by Neal Smith and the band relocated to Los Angeles.

In 1968, they learnt that Todd Rundgren already had a band with the name “The Nazz” so again the boys had to come up with another stage name. Furnier realized that if the group were to succeed, they would have to come up with a catchy gimmick and that all other bands were not exploiting the showmanship potential, when on stage.

Furnier then plucked the name “Alice Cooper” out of thin air and it became the new name for the band. Initially the name was only meant for the band, but after performing on stage, many fans would approach him and call him “Alice”, possibly because he was the frontman to the group. Nonetheless, Furnier adopted the name and then slowly morphed into an androgynous witch, in tattered women’s clothing and wearing strange outrageous makeup. Cooper had his gimmick which would definitely have the potential to cause considerable social controversy and grab headlines. Cooper would later admit that the name change and stage persona was his most important and and one of his most brilliant career moves.

Coopers admiration for the works of surrealist artists such as Salvador Dal, would further inspire their future stage antics. In 1969 they released “Pretties for you” and “Easy Action”. This followed with the signing of a record deal with Warner Bros and the release of “Love it to death” which launched them into the best selling charts in 1971.

A whole string of albums would follow “Killer” (1972), “Schools Out” (1972), “Billion Dollar Babies” (1973) and “Muscle of Love” (1974).

The boys loved more than anything to tour, and took sheer delight in causing controversy after every performance. This was achieved with theatrical antics such as the ‘murder of infant dolls with blood everywhere on stage, boa constrictors draped around his neck, guillotines, and electric chairs and more…, all these props together with his extremely freaky look caused outrage, but also created a huge fan base.

In 1974, Cooper embarked on a solo career and the “Alice Cooper Band” was no more. The band members continued to perform and record but under the stage name “Billion Dollar Babies”.

1975, Cooper’s first album as a solo artist “Welcome to my Nightmare was a huge hit. Cooper then went on to do a number of guest appearances in various television shows.

Five years later and Cooper releases two new albums, “Special Forces” and “Zipper catches skin” but both failed to gain any momentum or interest. Cooper resurfaced in 1989 with a new album “Trash” which was a hit.

Cooper appeared in Wayne’s World’ (1992) and “The Last Temptation” (1994). Cooper continued to produce albums which have been relatively well received, “Dragon Town”(2002), “The Eyes of Alice Cooper”(2003), “Dirty Diamonds” (2005), “Along came the Spider” (2008) and “Welcome 2 my Nightmare” (2011)though they never quite matched the success and popularity of his earlier work.

In 2003, Cooper was given a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame and in 2004, he started broadcasting his radio show “Nights with Alice Cooper”, where the musician plays classic rock tracks and tells stories about his life. The show was broadcast on nearly 100 radio stations in the US, Canada as well as other countries worldwide. He also received an honorary degree from Grand Canyon University that same year.

More acclamations, in 2006, Cooper was given the Living Legend Awarrd at the Classic Rock and Roll of Honor event. He performed a duet with another very controversial performer, Marilyn Manson and scooped up several more honors in 2007.

Finally, Cooper and his former band were inducted into the “Rock and Roll Hall of Fame” by Rob Zombie, no kidding, in 2011.

Before Alice Cooper, it was taboo and really looked down upon to call yourself showbiz. So when he came along, Cooper went as far out on a limb as we possibly could. He did everything he could to annoy every parent in America, then backed it up with anthems that got played. He had 25 gold albums and sold 50 million records; it wasn’t a fluke.”

Cooper realized that times were changing; people weren’t as shocked as before. With the influence and pervasiveness of the media, the violence of our real-life, society killed shock. So Cooper adapted. He focused his shows on entertainment with his gruesome make-up, a boa constrictor around his neck and an unhealthy dose of fake blood. Although his humor was very dark, he claims his performances always were based on humor. And at the finale of every performance the star of the show got just what he deserved: decapitation or some other sadistic end. Although he has respect for artists like Marilyn Manson, he believes that Manson might take things a bit too seriously, and the Manson audience feels a bit shameful when all is said and done. But no matter what happens on Alice Cooper’s stage, or what evil story the lyrics tell, Cooper believes his job is to entertain his audience and to leave the people feeling good–to make them feel like they were “at the greatest party they were ever at in their lives.” As noted by Antony John, a fan who at one time had a website dedicated to the rocker, “Alice Cooper does not just give concerts; he creates shock-rock events that mesmerize, enchant, and torture audiences around the world.”

Alice Cooper is still recording. Cooper, who is about to enter his 70th year, still commands sold out concert crowds. He’s had more than 25 albums since 1969.

Listen To Older Voices : Pat Wilson – part 3

 Welcome to Listen To Older Voices, 
a program produced by Rob Greaves for Wesley Mission Victoria and podcast 
through the Toorak Times and Tagg.
Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

 

This is a special Baby Boomers edition and is the third program of a 4-part program featuring the Life and Times of Pat Wilson. 

In this penultimate program, Pat finishes the absolutely engrossing tale of the return of Ross and herself overland from the UK to Australia, a journey that involved largely hitchhiking, with some wonderful and terrifying stories. They arrive broke in Darwin and worked there for a while before returning to Melbourne.

It is also the now that Pat talks openly about Ross Wilson’s musical compatriot for many years – the much loved Ross Hannaford. Pat openly shares her stories of “Hanna” from the perspective of someone who met him early in his career when Ross Wilson was forming the Pink Finks, and as someone who spent a lot of time with him. Her insights into this wonderful man are shared openly with us and, in her words, he was the “sweetest, sweetest human being” she had ever met.

This part of her story also begins the tale of her career – her very successful career as Pat “The Bop-Girl” Wilson, and how this massive hit came about when she her husband Ross wrote it, with Pat recorded it, catapulting her into instant fame.

 

Click to hear Pat Wilson – Part 3


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon – 


[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]

Listen To Older Voices [The Baby Boomers] – Pat Wilson : Part 2

Image of Pat Wilson
Welcome to Listen To Older Voices, a program produced by Rob Greaves for 
Wesley Mission Victoria and podcast through the Toorak Times.
Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

 

This is the second of a 4-part program featuring the Life and Times of Pat Wilson. Born in the early 1950’s, Pat was always driven by a love for music. In this part of her story she talks about the literal explosion of Australian music in the 1960’s, particularly in regard to the bands and venues in and around Melbourne.

Pat also shares her story of how she came to meet Ross Wilson, who at this time was a young up and coming musician and who was certainly as charismatic as he was talented. Covering many topics, Pat talks about why Ross wasn’t eligible for the Vietnam War draft which caught many young men up during this period. She also shares her feelings on what was happening at that time in regard to the Vietnam war and the social upheavals associated with it.

However, it is the story of how Ross went to the UK to work and how she joined him there that really is a fascinating part of her story. There is their marriage, the story of the sharing of a magnificent old mansion with other musicians and, their return journey to Australia – overland hitchhiking, that demands our attention.

Click to hear Pat Wilson – Part 2


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon – 

[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]

Listen To Older Voices: Pat Wilson – Part 1

Welcome to Listen To Older Voices, a program produced by Rob Greaves
for Wesley Mission Victoria and podcast through the Toorak Times.

Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

The story of Baby Boomer Pat Wilson is told over 4-parts. It is the story of a woman that grew up in a working class family, but one where her parents highly valued both education and music. In the first part of her story we are introduced to her parents and we gain an understanding of how and why they had such a positive influence upon her.

We also gain an understanding of why this woman had such a passion for music, which would profoundly influence her future in many ways. However it would be a mistake to think music was the limit of her passions yet it was this love of music would lead her to eventually meet and marry one of Australia’s most decorated musicians – Ross Wilson.

Image of Ross & Pat Wilson
Ross & Pat Wilson

An avid reader and an avid follower of social issues these loves would also translate into concrete skills and beliefs later in her life. Now her stories are not just part of a rich story of the development of Australian music through the 1960’s and ‘70’s, but also reminds us of the excitement and pace of change that was driven by this Baby Boomer Generation.

Click to hear Pat Wilson – Part 1


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon –

 

[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]

Listen To Older Voices : Fred Woods – Part 2

Listen To Older Voices

Welcome to Listen To Older Voices, a program produced by Rob Greaves for Wesley Mission Victoria and podcast through the Toorak Times.

Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

In the final part of his story Fred Woods, who was born in 1918, is joined by his wife Marg who provides us with some of her background growing up in the early 1920’s in Canterbury. It’s a story in itself as to how she met Fred as her father was a Horse Master in the army, training officers to ride at Duntroon. In fact her father had served in the Queen’s Own Hussars. Certainly Fred’s story is really expanded with Marg’s contribution.

Queens own Hussars


However, we find ourselves still fascinated by Fred’s stories of life in the bush where he was still felling trees at 72 years of age. Never one to shirk hard physical work, even though time had caught up with him, he still had a vitality about him and an edge that showed that despite the hardships of the life he chose he came through it all with a sharp mind if not, a keen sense of humor. This is a delightful story.


Click  to hear Fred Woods – Part 2


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon –

[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]

SIR DONALD BRADMAN (Australian Cricketing Legend)

Sir Donald George Bradman was an Australian Cricket Player who many both peers and fans believe to be one of the greatest cricket players of all time, and definitely one of Australia’s most popular sporting heroes.

Bradman born on 27 August 1908 in Cootamundra, NSW, was the youngest son of George Bradman and Emily (Whatman) Bradman. Five children in total, a brother Victor, and sisters Islet, Lilian and Elizabeth May. At the age of two and a half years, the family relocated to Bowral, NSW.

As a youngster, Bradman became known for his obsessive practice, often hitting a ball repeatedly against a wall for hours upon hours, using only a cricket stump.

After a brief taste of tennis, he decided to dedicate his life to cricket, playing with the local boys before attracting sufficient attention at the age of eighteen to be drafted in grade cricket in Sydney.

Within a year he was representing NSW and three years after that he was making his Test debut. After receiving some criticism in the first Ashes series in 1928-29, Bradman worked constantly to perfect his game by targeting his weaknesses head on.

Despite occasional battles with illness, Bradman continued to dominate world cricket throughout the 1930’s. Bradman was so dominant that the English team resorted to ‘bodyline’ bowling on the Australian tour of 1933.

It was the time of the ‘Great Depression’ when cricket provided Australian’s with a few hours of relief, raising the spirit of a nation, until war intervened.

During the war, Bradman initially volunteered for the RAAF, but was later persuaded to join the army. In 1941, Bradman became ill and was diagnosed with fibrositis (an inflammation of fibrous connective tissue typically affecting the back and causing stiffness and pain), He was immediately discharged, and he would go on to suffer from this illness thoughout his life.

When the war ended, and approaching forty years of age (most players are retired by their mid-30s), he returned to play cricket, leading one of the most talented teams in Australia’s history. His final tour would be held in England in 1948.

Despite his less vigorous powers, he still managed to score 11 centuries and 2,432 runs on tour. The Australians won the tour 4-0. In the last test at Lords, Bradman went out to bat with an average of 101. Bradman left the ground with a standing ovation as he headed towards the famous Lords pavilion. On the occasion of his last international innings, Bradman needed four runs to be able to retire with a batting average of 100, but was dismissed for “a duck” by spin bowler Eric Hollies. England lost by an innings and he never batted again.

Over an international career spanning nearly 20 years from 1930 to 1948, Bradman’s statistical achievements were unparalleled. He broke scoring records for both first-class and Test cricket; his highest international score (334) stood for decades as the highest ever test score by an Australian. It was then equalled by Mark Taylor, who declared with his score at 334 not out in what many regard as a deliberate tribute to Bradman. In 2003 it was once more equalled then surpassed by another fellow Australian, Matthew Hayden, who fittingly went on to gain the highest score in Test cricket (380) up to that time.

For decades, Bradman was the only player with two Test triple centuries in a career. He was joined by West Indian Brian Lara in 2004; Lara broke Hayden’s record, and recorded the first Test quadruple century in history, in the process of joining Bradman in this exclusive club.

After retiring from cricket, Bradman went back to working as a stockbroker and remained a great ambassador for the sport.

 

He was awarded a knighthood in 1949, and a Companion of the Order of Australia (Australia’s highest civil honor) in 1979.

He was also famous for answering innumerable letters from cricket fans across the world, which he continued to do until well into his eighties.

In his private life, he married his childhood sweetheart Jessie and they went on to have two children, John and Lorraine.

Bradman was an intensely private person, probably because of the intense media scrutiny he suffered throughout his career. He also penned several books on cricket technique and tactics, which are now regarded as classics.

To sum him up, in the words of Prime Minister John Howard, “Bradman was the greatest living Australian”.

Listen To Older Voices : Fred Woods – Part 1

Listen To Older Voices

Welcome to Listen To Older Voices, a program produced by Rob Greaves for Wesley Mission Victoria and podcast through the Toorak Times.

Listen To Older Voices presents the stories, views and opinions of our older citizens. It is predominantly in a life & times format, with interviewees reflecting upon their lives from earliest memories. An underlying principal of the program is to promote the concept of positive ageing, reinforcing the principle that older people have & continue to make a valuable contribution to both their local & wider community.

This is part 1 of a 2-part program on Fred Woods. Originally aired in January of 2005, part 1 of the story of this then 87 year old deals with his early life. Having been bought up in the bush we learn how this led to him devoting his life to the timber industry. Fred commenced work as a feller at the age of 14 and he paints a vivid picture of life as a timber worker in the early 1930’s, and relates many wonderful as well as tragic stories including deaths.

Image of timber cutters
Victorian timber cutters circa 1930

Even Fred’s social life was outdoor based, revolving around hunting and fishing and both his working and personal life tell a story of a time when things were so different from today and yet, remind us that we have a great debt of gratitude to pay the this generation that has now largely passed

Click  to hear Fred Woods – Part 1


Previous LTOV Programs can be accessed clicking on this icon –

 

[Listen To Older Voices receives funding from the Commonwealth Government through the Commonwealth Home Support Program Program]